Cremated close as raw material for jewelry ...


Absolutely amazing idea, in terms of materials used, came up with the craftswoman Merry. Only 1/2 teaspoon of the ash of the beloved will be needed for each bead. But the photos, letters, and maybe the history of relationships - everything can help in creating jewelry.

Product author: Merry Coor.

Merry makes each bead by hand. First, a core bead is created, over which the ashes are laid in a spiral. The product ends with another layer of clear glass.

Merry has been practicing beads for about 15 years, but only a year ago it occurred to her to use the cremation results in her work.


There is a certain beauty in this idea. But most likely, we will have it misunderstood. We have no tradition to keep the ashes of loved ones in the family bedroom or to dispel it in the deceased’s favorite place.

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