Mind Games: 10 inconspicuous cinema techniques that make the film unforgettable

Sometimes we watch the movie excitedly, not looking up for a second - we are fascinated by the picture, the sound, the plot, the characters, and the atmosphere ... literally everything. Of course, leaving the cinema, we do not think about how tricky the games that the creators of the tape have just played with our minds, and due to which the director, cameramen and illuminators have achieved our “wow”. And there are a lot of tricks. We analyze the ten most interesting.

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Source: DTF

Dutch corner

Simply put, this is a littered horizon. Thanks to this technique, you can famously convey the hero's schizophrenia or its narcotic intoxication (remember, the Dutch corner was often used in the movie “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas”?). The viewer, who looks at the world from such a “wrong” angle, experiences a little discomfort and understands the psychological state of the hero better.Plus, sometimes the Dutch corner helps the director better convey the drama of the narration: the camera leans over, the hero's tragedy intensifies, the viewer more empathizes.

Sharp frame change

One frame, abruptly replacing the other - such a technique is needed to avoid displaying extra time intervals on the screen. That is, the events themselves are important, but what happened between them is not at all. Therefore, we take a few shots and dramatically shuffle them. Well, that is, not we, of course, but the director by the hands of cameramen and editors. It turns out dynamically and very intelligibly.

Hero's look on the screen

There is one famous film experiment, which was conducted by silent film director Lev Kuleshov. He glued two frames in a row: the first one showed the face of a man, who was looking, as it were, outside the frame, and the second - a bowl of soup. Having shown the audience gluing together, Kuleshov nodded in satisfaction: everyone without exception was sure that the person in the frame was hungry and therefore looked at the soup. Then kinogeny glued two other frames: the same man and a woman in a coffin. The audience whispered: the actor on the screen is clearly grieving. Kuleshov rubbed his hands - the experiment was a success.

The fact is that the look of the hero, wherever he was directed,emphasize interest to the viewer in the object. If a man looks at a woman, then he wants her; if he wants food, she wants to eat. At the same time, the actor’s mimic can remain “stony”, the main thing is what he is looking at.

Focus

Have you heard the term "depth of field"? Its essence lies in the fact that if you see two objects, the first (closest to you) will be very clear, and the one behind you will be blurred. You used this chip more than once on your cameras, right? Here and in the movie without focus anywhere, especially if you need to strengthen the perception and emphasize the main object in the frame.

L-junction and J-junction

At first glance, this seems to be incomprehensible (some transitions). However, the reality is very simple. L-transition - when you see a frame change, but still hear the sound from the previous frame. This is an extremely important and widespread method to orient us, the audience, in what is happening, to help us not to lose the thread of the plot.

J-junction is a completely inverse L-junction technique. Here we already hear the sound of the next frame, but we still do not see it. Often, by the way, this technique is used in horror films.


Waltz for One from INTELLECTUAL PROPAGANDA on Vimeo.

Saturation and light

Combine two movie receivers into one item to show you a little more. Let's start with saturation - this trick helps the creators of the picture (as in the case with the focus) to most clearly highlight an object worthy of the viewer's attention. By placing accents in this way, the director tells us what is important right now, on which it is worth concentrating especially.

As for the light, here we will unconsciously look at the illuminated object and we will not - the one that is in the shadows (magicians always resort to such methods). The creators of cinema are the same magicians, so why should they not highlight the important and not darken the secondary, highlighting the main objects of the composition?

Symmetry

Perhaps the most favorite trick of director Wes Anderson, who shot "Grand Budapest Hotel", "Kingdom of the Full Moon", "Dog Island", "Rushmore Academy" and many other film bestsellers. His creative handwriting is easy to define, since symmetry is almost never encountered in nature, which means that symmetrical frames will seem a priori unusual and a little magical to the viewer.

Perspective

Reception prospects is designed to give the frame depth and volume.Search engines characterize the prospect as “the technique of depicting spatial objects on a surface in accordance with the apparent reductions in their size, changes in the outlines of form and light and shadow relations that are observed in kind”. Simply put, it’s like this:

Audiovisual counterpoint

Often, the frame in the film accompanies the corresponding melody. In the horror film, such a melody grows as the victim approaches the killer, and in the pursuit, on the contrary, the music immediately sounds loudly and rhythmically to emphasize the intensity of the passions.

It happens that the music does not correspond to the frame at all (and this, paradoxically, is the correspondence). To give the scene a contrast in the painting “Apocalypse Today,” people were shot to classical music. But we will show you the “right example” - one of the most memorable in the X-Men saga.

Transition during action

Well, complete our selection of transition. The frame does not necessarily have to change when there is a logical pause. But it needs to be changed directly during the action, so that the viewer can see the scene from different sides. Complicated? Then watch.

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